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Almonds

Almonds

The almond tree is closely related to several other well known fruit trees such as apricots, cherries, peaches and plums. In fact, they all are species in the genus Prunus. Like most commercial edible nuts, almonds are predominantly cultivated in orchards. Notably, the pollination of the trees is carried out by bees during bloom, during which the weather should remain dry for a good crop. Irrigation of the orchards will be necessary during dry season. Once the almonds have fallen off the trees naturally, they are mechanically collected and taken to the processing plant.

Almonds and its sub products have a variety of uses; in the food industry for instance, whole shelled sweet almonds are consumed as a snack, either raw or roasted and salted; shelled sweet almonds (whole, in pieces or as meal) natural or blanched, are used as an ingredient in the bakery and confectionary industry (where they are sometimes used to add texture and flavour); sweet almond meal is the main ingredient for the production of marzipan amongst many other applications. Also relevant is almond oil for cosmetics and other minor applications. In the other hand, bitter almonds and its oil are mostly used in cooking and cosmetics.

Noticing that the Syrian almond contains high oil percentage making it very asked in the cosmetic industry (shampoo, creams…)